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These oatmeal raisin cookies are super simple to make and they take just 20 minutes. Each cookie is supremely chewy with a softness that lasts for days. 

oatmeal raisin cookies lined on a slate platter

Do you remember these cranberry white chocolate oatmeal cookies? Those cookies were thick and soft. Exactly how I love my oatmeal cookies.

If you also enjoy a soft-baked cookie, you will absolutely love today’s cookie! This warm cinnamon, raisin-packed, soft oatmeal cookie is out of this world.

It’s hands down the best oatmeal raisin cookies I’ve ever tried. It rivals my iced oatmeal cookies!


Why this recipe works

  • The cookie dough uses the perfect ratio of ingredients so the dough doesn’t need to be chilled. This saves so much time when making cookies!
  • Quick-oats are milled finer than old-fashioned oats. This means they’ll absorb less liquid so the cookies will not be dry.
  • The cookie base works with more than just raisins! Try adding chocolate chips or another dried fruit.
oatmeal raisin cookie with a bite taken out

Oatmeal raisin cookies recipe

This recipe calls for double the amount of brown sugar than white sugar. Brown sugar is white sugar mixed with molasses and it’s moist. The moisture from the brown sugar will produce a chewier cookie.

Then there’s a secret ingredient to keep the cookies soft because there’s nothing worse than a chewy cookie that almost breaks a tooth.

Also, the cookie dough doesn’t need to be refrigerated. It can go straight into the oven. I like to use a cookie scoop to portion the dough out and roll it into a ball so that the cookies will bake up nice and round.

This recipe is so fantastic that I even turned the cookies into oatmeal cream pies! Let’s go over how to make these easy oatmeal raisin cookies. Or you can scroll right to the bottom for the full, printable recipe!


Ingredients

To make these soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookies, you will need:

  • Fat: I used a combination of butter and shortening plus eggs to give the cookies flavor and the perfect texture.
  • Sugar: Use both brown sugar and white sugar for the very best results.
  • Corn syrup: My secret ingredient for keeping cookies soft for several days after they’ve been baked. Don’t skip it!
  • Vanilla: Use the best quality vanilla you can get your hands on. Pure vanilla is also recommended over the imitation stuff.
  • Flour: Regular all-purpose flour is preferred and make sure to properly measure the flour
  • Oats: Quick cook oats are best for oatmeal cookies. Don’t try to use old-fashioned rolled oats; it will ruin the texture.
  • Baking soda: Neede for a bit of rise.
  • Spices: Salt and cinnamon are what I prefer.
  • Raisins: I use dark raisins but golden raisins would be a great option as well.

These are the supplies you need to get started

  • Stand mixer: A stand mixer will make the process easier but you can knead the dough by hand.
  • Cookie scoop: I like to use this one to keep cookies uniform in size.
  • Silicone spatula: It’s just easier to fold in the oats and raisins with one of these.
  • Baking sheet: You need 4 large baking sheets to fit about 40 cookies.
oatmeal raisin cookies scattered on a slate platter

How to make oatmeal raisin cookies

I’ll walk you through exactly how to make the best oatmeal raisin cookies. Let’s go! Remember, you can keep scrolling for the full recipe at the bottom of the page.

  1. Combine the wet ingredients. Beat the butter and shortening together then beat in the sugars, eggs, corn syrup, and vanilla.
  2. Combine the dry ingredients. Add the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt to a bowl and whisk them until well combined.
  3. Combine the wet and dry ingredients. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture and beat them together just until almost all of the flour is incorporated.
  4. Add the oats and raisins. Fold the oats and raisins into the batter until well incorporated.
  5. Bake. Place 1 tablespoon size balls of cookie dough on baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Bake the cookies for 8-10 minutes.
oatmeal raisin cookie dough in a bowl and shaped in balls on baking sheet

My secret to soft, chewy oatmeal raisin cookies:

There are two ingredients I like to add that helps keep cookies soft and chewy: 

Corn syrup – I recently began adding corn syrup to my cookie dough. It’s a little tip that I picked up from Better Homes and Gardens and first used it for these chocolate chunk apricot cookies. One tablespoon is all you need. It will leave your cookies soft for days after they are made. It’s wonderful; don’t leave it out.

Shortening – I have also begun to experiment with shortening and have found that it does wonders for the texture of a cookie. Shortening will make the cookies impeccably soft. I loved it in my chewy ginger snap cookies and so did you.

oatmeal raisin cookie with a bite taken out to show insides

Storing & Freezing

To store: Keep the cooled cookies in an airtight container with a slice of bread or tortilla. Store at room temperature for up to 3 days.

To freeze: Freeze cookies in an airtight freezer bag for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator.

Unbaked cookie dough can be shaped into balls and frozen for up to 3 months. Freeze individually on a baking sheet until firm, then transfer to an airtight freezer-safe container.

Frozen cookie dough balls can be baked straight from the freezer, with no need to thaw. Add a minute or two to the baking time.

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oatmeal raisin cookies lined on a slate platter

Old Fashioned Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Yield: 40 cookies
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Soft and chewy oatmeal cookies loaded with raisins. These cookies are ready in less than 20 minutes to make!

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (113 g) unsalted butter, softened
  • ½ cup (113 g) vegetable shortening, softened - Note 1
  • 1 cup (210 g) light brown sugar, packed
  • ½ cup (100 g) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup - Note 2
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ¾ cups (227 g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups (267 g) quick-cooking oats
  • 1 cup (149 g) raisins

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375ºF. Line a baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter and shortening with an electric mixer until well blended. 
  3. Add the sugars, beat until fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, beat well after each addition. Beat in the corn syrup and vanilla.
  4. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Stir with a whisk. 
  5. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture, beat on low speed just until combined. With a silicone spatula, gently stir in the oats and raisins.
  6. Roll the dough out into 1 tablespoon-sized balls. Place the dough balls 2 inches apart on the prepared pan. 
  7. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes. Allow the cookies to cool on the pan for 2 minutes; transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Notes

  1. Shortening – I have found that it does wonders for the texture of a cookie. Shortening will make the cookies impeccably soft.
  2. Corn syrup – I recently began adding corn syrup to my cookie dough. It’s a little tip that I picked up from Better Homes and Gardens. One tablespoon is all you need. It will leave your cookies soft for days after they are made. It’s wonderful; don’t leave it out.

Make ahead tip

  1. Keep the cooled cookies in an airtight container with a slice of bread or tortilla. Store at room temperature for up to 3 days.
  2. Freeze the cookies for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator. Shape the dough into balls and freeze individually on a baking sheet until firm, then transfer to an airtight freezer-safe container. Frozen cookie dough balls can be baked straight from the freezer, with no need to thaw. Add a minute or two to the baking time.

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 40 Serving Size: 1 cookie
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 51Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 10mgSodium: 64mgCarbohydrates: 10gFiber: 0gSugar: 3gProtein: 1g

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Since different brands of ingredients have different nutritional information, the values shown are just an estimate.

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117 Comments

  1. Love the softness of these cookies. Thanks for the recipe

  2. Diana Hoffeditz says:

    Oooohhh my!!! I just baked these…pulled them out of the oven and had to have one while they were still warm. Homerun!!! Perfect in every way!! Soft, chewy and packed full of flavor!! I followed your recipe to a few..didn’t change a thing. I even used the corn syrup. I will make these again! Very soon..these are my go to recipe for oatmeal raisin cookies!! Thankyou so much! Can’t wait to try more of your recipes????

    1. They’re always a hit with everyone around here. So glad to hear you enjoyed them!!

  3. Love! Love! Love! THIS recipe! I also had to sub the veg shortening for solid coconut oil….added pecans, white choc chips and …..wait for it
    Raisinets!!! Turned out SOoooooooo Awsome!!!????

  4. Love this recipe however my family doesn’t like raisins so we left those out BUT this time I am going to add a small amount of small dark chocolate chips and pecans. Thanks for the recipe!!

  5. Vicki Davis says:

    Love this recipe!! Loved how soft these cookies were. Didn’t realize that you use vegetable oil in recipe to make cookies soft. Thank you, again, love recipe.

    1. Don’t use vegetable oil, use shortening. There’s a difference! Oil will most likely ruin the cookies.

  6. Joseph T. says:

    So I substituted the butter and shortening for organic virgin coconut oil because of my family dairy allergy and I did not have shortening. I also substituted the corn syrup for honey. It turned out AMAZING!!! It is so soft and delicious. They did not last very long. My new favorite oatmeal raisin cookie recipe. Thank you!!!

  7. I have a question, how long can I store these for after I make them?

    1. The cookies will keep for up to 3 days stored in an airtight container at room temperature. Or you can freeze the cookies for up to 3 months.

  8. Hello, Can I use Molasses in place of corn syrup or will that mess something up? Thanks so much!

      1. Thank you! Then it looks like I’ll be trying a batch of these for my hubby and his students. 🙂 They like their weekly or biweekly sweet treats lol. He’s requested Oatmeal Raisin so I of course had to check for a recipe from you!

  9. Jen, should this dough be sticky?

    1. It will be a little “tacky” but it shouldn’t be so sticky that it’s impossible to roll into balls. The video shows a great representation of what the dough should look like.

  10. I made 3 versions of these yesterday. I split the recipe in half (it split really well) and did half raisin, half chocolate chip, and they were amazing!
    I also did a half-batch using GLUTEN-FREE all-purpose flour and literally couldn’t tell the difference!

    They all had a lovely texture, just the right amount of cinnamon, not too-too sweet.
    Absolutely addicting.
    Great hit at the office!!
    This will be my absolute go-to for oatmeal cookie from now on.

    1. That’s wonderful to hear! I’m so happy they came out just as delicious with gluten-free flour.