Chai Pear Scones

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Simply delicious Chai Pear Scones that are tender and perfect with a cup of coffee or tea. Each scone is thick and buttery with a crisp exterior while the centers remain soft and flaky. Loads of fresh pear is speckled throughout to ensure you get some in each bite. Chai spices make these scones great for breakfast on a cold day.

Overhead view of chai pear scones on white parchment paper with a slice of pear.

I love pears and don’t feel like I use them enough in my baking. I adore fruit-filled scones and figured this would be a good opportunity to include pear.

I used my favorite soft scone base. It’s also the base for my blueberry buttermilk scones and my lemon cream cheese scones with strawberries. I incorporated loads of chai spices – cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cardamom.

Chai is one of my absolute favorite winter spices. I’ve used it in a variety of recipes like these chai cookies. But, it’s exceptional in today’s scones.

Pear and chai truly are an incredible combo. I love the warm comforting aroma of chai. It fills the air as the scones bake and is just pure heaven.

These chai pear scones came out so tender and buttery. It’s impossible to eat just one. Especially when they are smothered with sweet cinnamon glaze!

Angled view of chai pear scones on a baking sheet lined with white parchment paper and slices of pear scattered about.

Tips for light & flaky scones

  1. Keep the dough cold by using cold ingredients
  2. Handle the dough a little as possible
  3. Shape and freeze the scones for 30 minutes before baking

My favorite tools for making scones

Close up view of chai pear scones on a baking sheet with slices of pear.

Simply delicious Chai Pear Scones that are thick, tender, and buttery with crisp exteriors and soft, flaky centers. You will love this easy recipe!

Chai Pear Scones

Simply delicious Chai Pear Scones that are tender and perfect with a cup of coffee or tea. Each scone is thick and buttery with a crisp exterior while the centers remain soft and flaky. Loads of fresh pear is speckled throughout to ensure you get some in each bite. Chai spices make these scones great for breakfast on a cold day.
4.43 from 7 votes
Print Rate
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings: 8 large scones
Calories: 413kcal
Author: Jen Sobjack

Ingredients

For the scones

For the glaze

  • 1 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 3-4 tablespoons heavy cream

Instructions

Make the scones

  • In a large bowl, whisk the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, and cardamom together. 
  • Cut the butter into the flour using a pastry blender, 2 knives, or your fingertips. The mixture should look like coarse crumbs. 
  • Gently fold in the pears. Whisk the vanilla and buttermilk together and gradually add it to the flour mixture. 
  • Stir just until the dough comes together. You may not need all the buttermilk. Add a little at a time until the mixture is moist but not too wet. Do not over mix the dough or the scones will be tough.
  • Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and gently knead the dough four or five times. Pat the dough into a 7-inch round circle.
  •  Cut the circle in half, then cut each half into four triangle shaped wedges. Arrange the scones 2 inches apart on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Place the scones in the freezer for 30 minutes.
  • Position the oven rack in the center of the oven and heat to 400°F. Brush the tops of the scones with cream. 
  • Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool and drizzle with glaze. Scones are best enjoyed right away.

Make the glaze

  • Combine all the ingredients for the glaze in a small bowl and whisk until smooth.

Make ahead tip

  • You can refrigerate the dough overnight then simply shape the scones and bake them the next day.
  • You can keep leftover scones for up to 2 days in the refrigerator.
  • Unglaze scones can be frozen for up to three months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight then reheat and glaze before serving.

Notes

This recipe yields 8 large scones. For smaller scones, cut the dough into  16 pieces instead of 8.
Watch the scones closely as they bake because smaller scones may require a shorting baking time.

Nutrition

Serving: 1scone | Calories: 413kcal

Nutritional values here on my recipes should be used as a general guide only. Since different brands of ingredients have different nutritional information, the values shown are just an estimate.

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Nutritional values here on my recipes should be used as a general guide only. Since different brands of ingredients have different nutritional information, the values shown are just an estimate.

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20 Comments

  • Tanya

    These are amazing! I made two batches, stored the dough overnight and baked in the morning. Best kids soccer snack and parents thought they were the best too. I am making 2 more batches now!

  • Dawn

    In the first ingredients list, it lists ginger as being from the produce section, which indicates fresh ginger root (which would be grated). Then in the recipe, it appears that the ginger is powdered (the hyperlink leads to picture of jar of powdered), the same as the cinnamon etc.
    Which is correct to use? Fresh or powdered?

    • Jen Sobjack

      I’m confused at what “first ingredient list” you are referring to. There’s only one ingredient list on the post and it’s in the recipe. Use 1 teaspoon of ground ginger.

      • Dawn Lavers

        I’m sorry, by “first” list, I meant the list of ingredients you see when you first click on the recipe picture on Pinterest. It shows, by category break down (ie: produce, dairy, baking & spices) the ingredients needed for the recipe. Under produce, it listed ginger and pear, so I thought it meant fresh grated ginger root. Under baking & spices, it listed cardamom, cinnamon and nutmeg.

        After saving the pin and then going to your blog, the ginger was then listed in the recipe right along with the other dry ingredients, along with a hyperlink to Amazon where McCormick powdered ground ginger could be purchased. So I was asking which to use, fresh grated from produce aisle, or powdered from spice rack. I bought both, but ultimately discerned it meant the powdered, which is what I used.

        Anyway, I made them. I don’t know what happened, but they were awful. They looked great, just like your pictures, but they tasted like raw flour, and nothing else. I made them for a high tea party, and everyone agreed. They described them as “dough-y and not scone-like in consistancy”. Thankfully we had store bought scones as a back up (which I detest, btw, but apparently my friends prefer the dry little brick-like scones from Publix). I was so sad, because I wanted to WOW my friends with these scones, but I ended up embarrassed because no one wanted to eat my home baked scones, they chose the horrible store bought ones instead.

        I even re-warmed them, hoping that maybe they were slightly underbaked and that a few more minutes in the oven would fix it. But they weren’t underbaked. They WERE very moist and soft on the inside (not raw though), and nicely crispy on the outside, they rose nicely, and were beautiful to look at, but they tasted like there were no spices at ALL in them. No pear taste, no chai taste, just flour taste. Now the glaze, THAT had excellent flavor!

        I promise, I followed the recipe to the letter, and did everything exactly as instructed, but, like I said, I don’t know what in the world happened. They were just yucky!

        I want to try again, but I honestly don’t know what I would do differently, because I didn’t vary from the recipe at all the first time! I wish I had taken pictures to show you how lovely they LOOKED anyway.

        Any suggestions? I live in Florida, and wonder if the low altitude had anything to do with it. But like I said, they rose perfectly, so I’m just stumped.

        • Jen Sobjack

          Unfortunately, I have no control over how Pinterest categorizes the ingredient list. For any recipe found on Pinterest, I would suggest clicking through and following the recipe from the original source. And I’m sorry you didn’t like the scones. I’ve had nothing but positive feedback on them so I’m not really sure what happened with yours. I would say it is strange for them to have no taste considering there’s a full teaspoon of cinnamon and ginger plus other spices in them. My only suggestion is maybe the flour was measured incorrectly and you used too much by mistake? I have a tutorial on how to measure flour for all my recipes –> How to Measure Flour.

  • Kirsten

    I wanted to use my Harry & David pears. Perfect recipe! This recipe made delicious scones and I will use it again (and again). Thank you!

  • Nicole

    Seriously, best scones I’ve ever made. Absolutely delicious! If you’re cooking at altitude (were in CO) you’ll need to add 15 more min of baking time. Thank you for this amazing recipe!

  • Cortney

    Not seeing in the recipe where the spices are incorporated. Looking at the pictures, I am assuming in with the glaze. I see quite a few specks that don’t normally come with cinnamon but more so with the nutmeg. Am I right or do the spices get mixed in with the dry ingredients?